Helitaanka Luuqada

Helitaanka Luuqada iyo Barashaada Labo Luuqadood

Native American / Indigenous Languages

Prior to the 1800s, the languages most commonly spoken in the area that is now Washington State included different Coast Salish languages spoken by Tribes in the Puget Sound region, Interior Salish languages spoken by Tribes east of the Cascade mountains and languages spoken by the Makah, Quileute and other tribes on the Pacific coast. Despite U.S. government policies that aimed to erase Native languages and cultural traditions, Tribes in this region have preserved their languages, and are working to revitalize their use among youth and elders. All school districts in Washington State are now required to incorporate tribal government, history and culture into their social studies curricula, and districts are encouraged to offer instruction in Native American languages. Districts are encouraged to develop government to government relationships with the Tribes in their areas to partner in meeting this charge. Many Tribes offer resources and classes in their languages through their Tribal language or education departments, and partner with their area school districts to ensure students can earn credit for learning their own language. Some school districts offer classes at elementary or high school levels in their area Tribes' languages. Teachers of Native American languages must be certified according to the First Peoples' Language, Culture and Oral Tribal Traditions Certification Program. (Read more about the Certification program, here: https://www.pesb.wa.gov/innovation-policy/equity-initiatives/first-peoples-language-culture-and-oral-traditions-certification/). Learn more: Many Tribal Governments share information about their history, culture and languages on their websites and in their museums.  Find links and information about Washington Tribes at the Governor's Office of Indian Affairs (GOIA): www.goia.wa.gov or at Washington Tribes: www.washingtontribes.org. Learn More: Read about and find curriculum materials for the Tribal Sovereignty Curriculum developed by the Tribes in Washington in collaboration with OSPI's Office of Native Education, Since Time Immemorial, at: http://www.k12.wa.us/IndianEd/TribalSovereignty/.

Supporting Bilingual Abilities

Washington state public schools are doing many different things to encourage students to learn more than one language. Some schools offer dual language immersion programs, meaning that students learn in English and another language. For students who speak another language, there are opportunities to earn credits for high school graduation by taking a test (to earn what are called competency credits). Students must earn credits in world languages to graduate now and students with these skills already can make great use of meeting those requirements. School districts are also encouraged to partner, in government to government relationships with Tribes, to offer opportunities to learn indigenous Tribal languages, taught by teachers certified by the Tribes. Finally, students who have demonstrated a high level of proficiency in English and a second language can earn a Seal of Biliteracy when they graduate. Bilingualism is important and helps to preserve and explore different cultures through languages. Learn more about benefits of supporting bilingualism for your child: Speak Your Language! (available in 23 languages) http://www.k12.wa.us/MigrantBilingual/SpeakYourLanguage.aspx

Dual Language Immersion Programs

What they are: Programs where students receive instruction directly in two languages during the school day. The goal is for students to learn to speak, listen, read and write in both languages. Generally, students are expected to participate in a Dual Language program for several years to reach that goal. Where they are: In an increasing number of public schools in Washington state. Check out the map posted on OSPI's Dual Languages web page to find current Dual Language programs around the state: http://www.k12.wa.us/MigrantBilingual/DualLanguages.aspx. Who can participate: Generally, dual language programs are “choice” programs. That means families that are interested can request that their child be placed in a dual language program. If there is more interest in the program than space available, districts might use a lottery system or a first come/first placed system. Check with your district's office to find out if there is a Dual Language Immersion option in your district, and what the process is for enrolling. What languages are taught: Spanish and English Dual Language programs are most common in Washington State. Some districts have Dual Language programs that combine Japanese and English; Mandarin Chinese and English; and Vietnamese and English. We can expect to see more languages added over time. Where to learn more: Find resources for Professional Learning and Curriculum and watch videos featuring some of Washington's dual language programs at OSPI's Dual Language website: http://www.k12.wa.us/MigrantBilingual/DualLanguages.aspx.

World Language Competency Credits

School districts in Washington State can offer students the option of taking an exam that shows their ability to speak, listen, read, and write in a second language.  Students can earn up to 4 high school credits for world language.

  • Students can earn credits by showing what they know on the language exams, without having to take a class at school.
  • For students who have maintained their ability to speak in their own, or their family's first language, they can use these experiences to earn credits toward graduation requirements.
  • Students can earn credits in languages that are not offered as courses at their own high school.

To earn credits, students will need to be able to speak, listen, read and write in the language.  Sometimes, students who speak a language other than English at home will need to spend some time studying the language more formally to do well on the exam. Learn More: Students/Families and Educators – find more information about the competency credit option and Sample World Language Tests at OSPI's World Languages web page, here: http://www.k12.wa.us/WorldLanguages/StudentsEarnCredits2.aspx. To find out details regarding when and where tests are offered, and whether there is a fee, contact your high school counselor, look on your district's web page, or call your district's office. Community schools and culture clubs can work with their local school districts to propose that students receive World Language Competency-based Credit based on an agreement between the district and program. Work with the district to determine whether students can be granted the credits before they take a test or class. For more information, visit OSPI's World Languages web page. http://www.k12.wa.us/WorldLanguages/CompetencyBasedCredits.aspx If your district does not yet offer a World Language Competency Credit test, talk with your school counselor and principal, and reach out to your district's administration to ask about options for making the tests available. If you need help, contact OEO. For more information, on the program visit the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction's Road Map World Language Credit Program page. World Language Credit Brochures English (black & white) Amharic Arabic Chinese Nepali Punjabi Russian Somali Spanish Tagalog Vietnamese World Language Credits Video Clips on YouTube Courtesy of OneAmerica: Samoan Somali Spanish Tagalog Tigrinya, Vietnamese Amharic Cambodian Chinese Korean Punjabi Russian Arabic

Washington State Seal of Biliteracy

School districts in Washington can offer students the option of earning the Washington State Seal of Biliteracy. The Seal of Biliteracy recognizes public high school graduates who have attained a high level of proficiency in speaking, reading, and writing in one or more world languages in addition to English. Students can earn the Seal in different ways, including:

  • Taking world language courses at school and earning strong scores on AP (Advanced Placement) or IB (International Baccalaureate) World Language exams
  • Earning 4 World Language Competency-based Credits

For more details, including other ways students can demonstrate a high level of proficiency in a world language, visit OSPI's World Languages web page, here: http://www.k12.wa.us/WorldLanguages/SealofBiliteracy.aspx. School districts do not have to participate, but they can.  If your district does not offer the option of the Seal of Biliteracy, talk with your high school counselor and principal and reach out to your school district administrators. Educators interested in learning more about how to participate and offer the Seal of Biliteracy can find detailed information at OSPI's World Languages web page, here: http://www.k12.wa.us/WorldLanguages/SealofBiliteracy.aspx.

English Language Learners

Students who are learning English are often called English Language Learners (ELLs) or English Learners (ELs). School Districts are required to make sure that their English Learner students can participate in meaningful ways in the school and its programs. 

Schools need to:

  • Identify English Learners: At the beginning of each school year, and when new families move into the school, school districts ask about home languages in order to try to identify students who might need English language instruction and supports.
  • Assess English Learners: If a student is still learning English and might need help with English, school districts will do a test, or “assessment”, as soon as possible, to determine how much English the student knows and where the student needs help. Students are tested every year to help the school decide if they are still eligible for English Learner instructional supports. To understand what the language proficiency test results mean and what the levels are, look at  OSPI's Migrant/Bilingual website, here: https://www.k12.wa.us/student-success/access-opportunity-education/migrant-and-bilingual-education (available in Arabic, Chinese, Korean, Marshalese, Punjabi, Sgaw-Karen, Somali, Spanish, Tagalog, Ukranian, and Vietnamese).
  • Provide Language Supports: In Washington State, school districts must  provide “transitional bilingual instructional programs” (unless it is not practical) that include teaching the student in the student's home or first language while the student is also learning English.  If it is not practical for the school district to teach the student in both languages, then the district can offer “alternative instructional programs.”  Some examples are: bringing English language instruction to the student's regular classroom (sometimes called “push in”) or pulling the student out of the regular classroom for instruction (sometimes called “pull out”).  The student can learn English in groups or just on their own with a teacher.  Parents can always choose to opt-out of English Learner programs.
  • Ensure Equal Access and Inclusion of English Learners School districts must make sure that English Learner students have the opportunity to participate in all district programs and services that they qualify for, including Highly Capable programs, extra-curricular programs.

Sometimes, making sure that the student can participate means offering interpretation or translation. If you have questions about how or whether an English Learner student can participate in a school program or service, try:

  • Talking to the school principal; and/or
  • Contacting the school district's English Learner department.

If you need help, please contact OEO. Learn more about how school districts can provide meaningful access for students learning English by reading the US Department of Education's English Learner Toolkit. Available in multiple languages on the US Department of Education's website, here: https://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/oela/english-learner-toolkit/index.html

Learn more about English Learner Assessments and Programs at OSPI's Migrant/Transitional Bilingual Instruction web page, here: https://www.k12.wa.us/student-success/access-opportunity-education/migrant-and-bilingual-education Read more about how (and why) public schools are doing more to help students keep and build skills in multiple languages, here: https://www.k12.wa.us/student-success/equity-education/migrant-and-bilingual-education/bilingual-education-program and here: https://www.k12.wa.us/student-success/equity-education/migrant-and-bilingual-education/dual-language-resources.

Helitaanka Luuqada -- Fasiraada iyo Turjumaada

Adeegyada Helitaanka ee OEO ga oo leh Fasiraad ama Turjumaad 

  • Codso Fasiraad Marka aad Wacdo

OEO waxay adeegsataa adeegga fasiraada khadka taleefanka. Wac 1-866-297-2597 kadibna codso turjumaan adoo sheegaaya magaca luuqada aad kuhadasho.

  • Hel Koobiyada turjuman ee Lashaqaynta OEO (Macluumaad kooban oo laxariira sida aan ushaqayno), iyo foomamka ogolaanshaha OEO ee laxariirida Dugsiyada Halkaan: 
  • Codso turjumaad ama fasiraad laguugu sameeyo dukumintiyada OEO adoo wacaaya 1-866-297-2597 ama iimeel noogusoo diraaya oeoinfo@gov.wa.gov 

Helitaanka Luuqada iyo Ilaha Macluumaadka ee Qoysaska

Waalidiintu waxay xaq uleeyihiin inay helaan macluumaad kayimaada dugsiga oo kuqoran luuqad ay fahmayaan.  Degmada dugsigu waa inay adeegyada fasiraada iyo/ama turjumaada siisaa, marka loobaahdo, si ay ula xariirto waalidiinta aan aqoon badan ulahayn Ingiriiska (ayna kujiraan waalidiinta ay kuyartahay aqoonta kuhadalka, dhagaysiga, akhriska ama qorista luuqada Ingiriiska) Ka akhri macluumaad dheeri ah oo kusaabsan Xaquuqda Waalidiinta aan Aqoonta Fiican Ulahayn Ingiriiska (LEP) iyo waajibaadka kasaaran degmada dugsiiga arintaan webseetka Macluumaadka ardayda Ingiriiska dhigta ee Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights (Xafiiska Xaquuqda Madaniga ah uqaabilsan Waaxda Waxbarashada), halkaan: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/ellresources.html (Xaashida Macluumaadka Waalidiinta Aan Aadka u Aqoon Ingiriiska iyo Dugsiyada iyo Degmooyinka Dugsiga ee Xariirka lasameeya waalidiintaas oo lagusoo daabacay luuqado kaladuwan, ayna kujiraan Cambodian, Chinese, Hmong, Korean, Laotian, Russian, Isbaanish, Tagalog iyo Vietnamese.) Tilmaamo kooban oo loogu Talagalay Waalidiinta/Qoysaska: Haddii aad ubaahan tahay fasiraad ama turjumaad si aad ufahanto macluumaad kaaga yimid dugsiga cunugaaga ama aad laxariirto dugsiga cunugaaga: 

-Codso turjumaan adoo tagaaya xafiiska hore ee dugsigaaga, ama waydii hadii qofka shaqaalaha ah u kuu keeni karo turjumaan taleefanka wax kaaga fasirada adoo adeegsanaaya "laynka luuqada";

-Wac nambarka taleefanka dhexe ee dugsiga kana codso turjumaan;

-Dir iimeel kooban (oo kuqoran af Ingiriis ama luuqadaada hooyo) oo aad codsanayso in qof kusoo waco, asagoo wata turjumaan, si laguugu qorsheeyo kulan laxariira su'aal ama walaac aad qabto.

Iimeel tusaale ah udir si aad ucodsato turjumaan:

Dear Teacher (or Principal, Counselor, Nurse):  Macalinka Qaaliga ahoow (ama Maamulaha, Lataliyaha, Kalkaalisada):

My name is ____.   Magacaygu waa ____.

I am the parent of ____.   Waxaan ahay waalidka ____.

I want to talk with you about my child. Waxaan doonayaa inaan cunugayga kaala hadlo. 

Can you please call me with an interpreter? Fadlan waad isoo wici kartaa adoo uu tujumaan kula joogo? 

My phone number is: ____. Nambarka taleefankaygu waa: ____.

Thank you.  Mahadsanid.

-Haddii laguusoo diro ogaysiis qoran, iimeel, ama dukumiinti kale oo kuqoran af Ingiriis aadana fahmayn qoraalka, usheeg qofka kuusoo diray inuu kuugusoo turjumo qoraalka luuqadaada.

 -Haddii aan qofku kusiin karin qoraalka oo si buuxda uturjuman xiligaad ubaahantahay, codso inaad lakulanto shaqaalaha dugsiga iyo qof turjumaan ah si dukumiintiga hadal ahaan laguugu fasiro, ayadoo lagu siinaayo waqti aad xasuusinta qoraalka kuqoran karto.

Communicating-with-Schools_Language-Access-Trifold-Multilanguage.pdf ama OEO's  Kaarka Taageerada Fasiraada

Haddii aad su'aalo qabto, ama aad ubaahan tahay in lagaa caawiyo helitanaka fasiraad ama turjumaan, iskuna daydo inaad laxariirto:

-Maamulaha Dugsiga Cunugaaga;

-Agaasimaha Dugsiga Degmadaada ee Adeegyada Luuqada Ingiriiska (ELL); ama

-Agaasimaha Sinaanta ee Dugsiga Degmadaada.

Haddii aad ubaahantahay caawimaad, fadlan kawac OEO nambarka 1-866-267-2597. Fasriraada khadka taleefanka ayaa laheli karaa.

Language Access Resources for School Districts

Find information and resources at OSPI's Equity & Civil Rights Interpretation and Translation Services page, including:

  • Civil rights laws that require school districts to communicate with parents in a language they can understand;
  • Fact sheets on Parents' Rights re Interpretation and Translation Services translated into 21 different languages;
  • Multi-language poster informing families how to request interpretation or translation;
  • Link to WSSDA Language Access Policy and Procedure;
  • Details for setting up a telephone interpreter service and/or written translation services via the state contract;
  • Links to online training for interpreters, and school staff who work with interpreters.

http://www.k12.wa.us/Equity/Interpretation.aspx You can also check out OEO's handout on Communicating with Families Using an Interpreter.

What if I don’t speak or read English well?

Notices and communication from the school about your child's attendance should be in your primary language. The school should make sure an interpreter is available for meetings to talk about your child's attendance.  If you are having a hard time getting an interpreter, you can try calling the school or the district main office. You can also call OEO for help at 1-866-297-2597.

How can OEO help?

OEO is here to listen to your questions and concerns, share information, and work with you to figure out what steps you can try to make things better for your child. In some cases, with a parent or guardian's permission, we can work directly with you and the school or district to try to clarify what's going on, and find out what's possible to address the situation. Read more about how we work, or call us at 1-866-297-2597.

Online Training

Civil Rights Protections for English Language Learners - August 25, 2013 (WMV) This webinar outlines the civil rights protections for English Language Learners and families with limited English proficiency. Speak Your Languages, a service through Highline Public Schools, offers free online trainings for people working with translators and interpreters. It also offers online introductory interpreter and translator courses for bilingual speakers who have not had access to professional training, but are providing interpreting or translating services in the community or workplace.

Resources in Other Languages

Arabic

1. Steps to Success: Communicating with Your Child's School – CADRE/Special Education

CADRE Steps to Success: Communicating with Your Child's School – a brochure with specific communication skills that may be helpful to parents as they develop and maintain partnerships with their child's school. Developed in partnership between CADRE and the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, originally published, May 2004:

English: http://www.directionservice.org/cadre/success.cfm

Also available in: Arabic http://www.directionservice.org/cadre/parent/artifacts/Arabic%20S2S.pdf

2. Fact Sheet, Q&A, Dear Colleague Letter re Enrollment Rights of Immigrant Students - OCR

· إجراءات الا لتحاق بالمدارس | School Enrollment Procedures - 05-08-2014

وقائع صحیفةة PDF (96K) | Fact Sheet أسئلة وأجوبة PDF (234K) | Questions and Answers صسدیقي العزیز PDF (269K) | Dear Colleague Letter

http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/howto-index.html#arabic

Cambodian

1. Important Document Notice - OSPI

If a situation arises when a school is unable to translate a document immediately, one method to ensure that limited English proficient families can access the information is by including a notice on the document, translated into the parent's primary language (e.g. on pre-printed stickers) informing families that they can contact the school to have the document translated. Sample Important Document Notice (in 9 languages)

From OSPI's Office of Equity and Civil Rights:  http://www.k12.wa.us/Equity/Interpretation.aspx

2. Fact sheet re Districts' Obligations to Communicate with LEP Parents - OCR

Fact Sheet for Limited English Proficient Parents and for Schools and School Districts that Communicate with Them (PDF) Schools may use this fact sheet from the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, to explain the school district's obligation to ensure that limited English proficient (LEP) students can meaningfully participate in educational programs and services, and to communicate information to LEP parents in a language they can understand. English | Cambodian

សិស្សដែលជាអ្នកសិក្សាភាសាអង់គ្លេស | English Learner Students – 01-07-2015

សិស្សដែលជាអ្នកសិក្សាភាសាអង់គ្លេស PDF (541K) | Fact Sheet: English Learner Students

ព័ត៌មានសម្រាប់មាតាបិតា និងអាណាព្យាបាលដែលចេះភាសាអង់គ្លេសតិចតួច PDF (116K) | Fact Sheet: Limited English Proficient Parents

http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/dcl-factsheet-el-students-201501-cambodian.pdf

http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/dcl-factsheet-lep-parents-201501-cambodian.pdf

Chinese

1. Important Document Notice - OSPI

If a situation arises when a school is unable to translate a document immediately, one method to ensure that limited English proficient families can access the information is by including a notice on the document, translated into the parent's primary language (e.g. on pre-printed stickers) informing families that they can contact the school to have the document translated. Sample Important Document Notice (in 9 languages)

From OSPI's Office of Equity and Civil Rights:  http://www.k12.wa.us/Equity/Interpretation.aspx

2. Fact sheet re Districts' Obligations to Communicate with LEP Parents - OCR

Fact Sheet for Limited English Proficient Parents and for Schools and School Districts that Communicate with Them (PDF) Schools may use this fact sheet from the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, to explain the school district's obligation to ensure that limited English proficient (LEP) students can meaningfully participate in educational programs and services, and to communicate information to LEP parents in a language they can understand. EnglishChinese

http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/dcl-factsheet-el-students-201501-chinese-ms.pdf

3. Steps to Success: Communicating with Your Child's School – CADRE/Special Education

CADRE Steps to Success: Communicating with Your Child's School – a brochure with specific communication skills that may be helpful to parents as they develop and maintain partnerships with their child's school. Developed in partnership between CADRE and the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, originally published, May 2004:

English: http://www.directionservice.org/cadre/success.cfm

Also available in:

Chinese (Simplified)

4. English Learner Toolkit Introduction

English Learners:

US Department of Education's Office of English Language Acquisition (OELA):

English Learner Toolkit – Introduction:

Introduction (PDF, 294KB) | Translations: Chinese simplified (PDF, 82KB) | Chinese traditional (PDF, 136KB)

5. Fact Sheet, Q&A, Dear Colleague Letter re Enrollment Rights of Immigrant Students - OCR

Chinese:

关于所有学生报名入学的权利 | School Enrollment Procedures - 05-08-2014

资料说明 PDF (253K) | Fact Sheet 相关问答 PDF (259K) | Questions and Answers 致同事信 PDF (230K) | Dear Colleague Letter

Hmong

1. Fact sheet re Districts' Obligations to Communicate with LEP Parents - OCR

Fact Sheet for Limited English Proficient Parents and for Schools and School Districts that Communicate with Them (PDF) Schools may use this fact sheet from the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, to explain the school district's obligation to ensure that limited English proficient (LEP) students can meaningfully participate in educational programs and services, and to communicate information to LEP parents in a language they can understand. English | | Hmong

2. Steps to Success: Communicating with Your Child's School – CADRE/Special Education

CADRE Steps to Success: Communicating with Your Child's School – a brochure with specific communication skills that may be helpful to parents as they develop and maintain partnerships with their child's school. Developed in partnership between CADRE and the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, originally published, May 2004:

English: http://www.directionservice.org/cadre/success.cfm

Also available in:

English Hmong

3. English Leaner Toolkit Introduction – OCR

US Department of Education's Office of English Language Acquisition (OELA):

English Learner Toolkit – Introduction:

Introduction (PDF, 294KB) Hmong (PDF, 60KB)

Korean

1. Fact sheet re Districts' Obligations to Communicate with LEP Parents - OCR

Fact Sheet for Limited English Proficient Parents and for Schools and School Districts that Communicate with Them (PDF) Schools may use this fact sheet from the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, to explain the school district's obligation to ensure that limited English proficient (LEP) students can meaningfully participate in educational programs and services, and to communicate information to LEP parents in a language they can understand. English | Korean

2. Notice of Special Education Procedural Safeguards – OSPI

Procedural Safeguards (Word, 42 pages) | PDF Booklet Layout: PUB | PDF

Translated Versions (Revised October 2013)

OSPI - Procedural Safeguards: http://www.k12.wa.us/SpecialEd/Families/Rights.aspx

3. Steps to Success: Communicating with Your Child's School – CADRE/Special Education

CADRE Steps to Success: Communicating with Your Child's School – a brochure with specific communication skills that may be helpful to parents as they develop and maintain partnerships with their child's school. Developed in partnership between CADRE and the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, originally published, May 2004:

English: http://www.directionservice.org/cadre/success.cfm

Also available in:

English

Korean

4. English Learner Toolkit Introduction – OCR

US Department of Education's Office of English Language Acquisition (OELA):

English Learner Toolkit – Introduction:

Introduction (PDF, 294KB) |Korean (PDF, 140KB)

5. Fact Sheet, Q&A, Dear Colleague Letter re Enrollment Rights of Immigrant Students - OCR

Korean:

· 모든 어린이들의 학교 입학 권리에 관한 정보| School Enrollment Procedures - 05-08-2014

요약 정보 PDF (289K) | Fact Sheet 질의 및 응답 PDF (386K) | Questions and Answers 동료 여러분께 서한 PDF (244K) | Dear Colleague Letter

Laotian

1. Fact sheet re Districts' Obligations to Communicate with LEP Parents - OCR

Fact Sheet for Limited English Proficient Parents and for Schools and School Districts that Communicate with Them (PDF) Schools may use this fact sheet from the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, to explain the school district's obligation to ensure that limited English proficient (LEP) students can meaningfully participate in educational programs and services, and to communicate information to LEP parents in a language they can understand. English | | Laotian

Russian

1. Fact sheet re Districts' Obligations to Communicate with LEP Parents - OCR

Fact Sheet, Information for Limited English Proficient Parents and for Schools and School Districts that Communicate with Them (Jan. 2015) download filesPDF (547K)

Translations: Russian PDF (573K),

From US Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/ellresources.html

2. Important Document Notice - OSPI

If a situation arises when a school is unable to translate a document immediately, one method to ensure that limited English proficient families can access the information is by including a notice on the document, translated into the parent's primary language (e.g. on pre-printed stickers) informing families that they can contact the school to have the document translated. Sample Important Document Notice (in 9 languages)

English

Russian

From OSPI's Office of Equity and Civil Rights:  http://www.k12.wa.us/Equity/Interpretation.aspx

7. Fact Sheet on Rights of English Learner Students

Fact Sheet, Ensuring English Learner Students Can Participate Meaningfully and Equally in Educational Programs (Jan. 2015) download filesPDF (443K)

From US Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights

http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/ellresources.html

8. English Learner Toolkit – Introduction

Introduction (PDF, 294KB) | Translations: Russian (PDF 426, KB) |

From US Department of Education's Office of English Language Acquisition

http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/oela/english-learner-toolkit/index.html.

Somali

1. Important Document Notice - OSPI

If a situation arises when a school is unable to translate a document immediately, one method to ensure that limited English proficient families can access the information is by including a notice on the document, translated into the parent's primary language (e.g. on pre-printed stickers) informing families that they can contact the school to have the document translated. Sample Important Document Notice (in 9 languages)

From OSPI's Office of Equity and Civil Rights:  http://www.k12.wa.us/Equity/Interpretation.aspx

2. Steps to Success: Communicating with Your Child's School – CADRE/Special Education

CADRE Steps to Success: Communicating with Your Child's School – a brochure with specific communication skills that may be helpful to parents as they develop and maintain partnerships with their child's school. Developed in partnership between CADRE and the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, originally published, May 2004:

English: http://www.directionservice.org/cadre/success.cfm

Also available in:

English Somali From CADRE, the National Center on Dispute Resolution in Special Education: http://www.directionservice.org/cadre/success.cfm

Spanish

1. Fact sheet re Districts' Obligations to Communicate with LEP Parents

Fact Sheet, Information for Limited English Proficient Parents and for Schools and School Districts that Communicate with Them (Jan. 2015) download filesPDF (547K)

Translations: Spanish PDF (194K),

From US Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/ellresources.html

2. Important Document Notice - OSPI

If a situation arises when a school is unable to translate a document immediately, one method to ensure that limited English proficient families can access the information is by including a notice on the document, translated into the parent's primary language (e.g. on pre-printed stickers) informing families that they can contact the school to have the document translated. Sample Important Document Notice (in 9 languages)

Spanish

From OSPI's Office of Equity and Civil Rights:  http://www.k12.wa.us/Equity/Interpretation.aspx

3. Steps to Success: Communicating with Your Child's School – CADRE/Special Education

CADRE Steps to Success: Communicating with Your Child's School – a brochure with specific communication skills that may be helpful to parents as they develop and maintain partnerships with their child's school. Developed in partnership between CADRE and the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, originally published, May 2004:

English: http://www.directionservice.org/cadre/success.cfm

Also available in:

English Spanish From CADRE, the National Center on Dispute Resolution in Special Education: http://www.directionservice.org/cadre/success.cfm

4. Fact Sheet on Rights of English Learner Students

Fact Sheet, Ensuring English Learner Students Can Participate Meaningfully and Equally in Educational Programs (Jan. 2015) download filesPDF (443K)

From US Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights

http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/ellresources.html

5. Dear Colleague Letter re English Learner Students and LEP Parents

· Dear Colleague Letter, English Learner Students and Limited English Proficient Parents (01/7/2015) download filesPDF (503.28K)

From US Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/ellresources.html

6. English Learner Toolkit – Introduction

Introduction (PDF, 294KB) | Translations: | Spanish (PDF, 65KB) |

From US Department of Education's Office of English Language Acquisition

http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/oela/english-learner-toolkit/index.html.

7. Fact Sheet, Q&A, Dear Colleague Letter re Enrollment Rights of Immigrant Students

Information from US Department of Education OCR (posted in section with Resources Available in Other Languages: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/howto-index.html).

Spanish:

· Los Derechos De Todos Los Niños A Matricularse En La Escuela | School Enrollment Procedures - 05-08-2014

Hoja informativa PDF (237K) | Fact Sheet Preguntas y respuestas PDF (196K) | Questions and Answers Carta a los Estimados Colegas PDF (177K) | Dear Colleague Letter

Tagalog

1. Fact sheet re Districts' Obligations to Communicate with LEP Parents - OCR

Fact Sheet for Limited English Proficient Parents and for Schools and School Districts that Communicate with Them (PDF) Schools may use this fact sheet from the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, to explain the school district's obligation to ensure that limited English proficient (LEP) students can meaningfully participate in educational programs and services, and to communicate information to LEP parents in a language they can understand. English | Tagalog

2. English Learners Toolkit – OCR

US Department of Education's Office of English Language Acquisition (OELA):

English Learner Toolkit – Introduction:

Introduction (PDF, 294KB) | Tagalog (PDF, 274KB)

3. Fact Sheet, Q&A, Dear Colleague Letter re Enrollment Rights of Immigrant Students - OCR

Tagalog:

Impormasyon sa Mga Karapatan ng Lahat ng mga Bata na Magpatala sa Paaralan | School Enrollment Procedures - 05-08-2014

Listahan ng mga Katotohanan: PDF (156K) | Fact Sheet Mga Tanong at Sagot PDF (185K) | Questions and Answers Sulat na “Minamahal na Kasamahan” PDF (155K) | Dear Colleague Letter

Vietnamese

1. Fact sheet re Districts' Obligations to Communicate with LEP Parents - OCR

Fact Sheet, Information for Limited English Proficient Parents and for Schools and School Districts that Communicate with Them (Jan. 2015) download filesPDF (547K) Translations: Vietnamese download files PDF (547K) From US Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/ellresources.html

2. Important Document Notice - OSPI

If a situation arises when a school is unable to translate a document immediately, one method to ensure that limited English proficient families can access the information is by including a notice on the document, translated into the parent's primary language (e.g. on pre-printed stickers) informing families that they can contact the school to have the document translated. Sample Important Document Notice (in 9 languages) English Vietnamese From OSPI's Office of Equity and Civil Rights:  http://www.k12.wa.us/Equity/Interpretation.aspx

3. Steps to Success: Communicating with Your Child's School – CADRE/Special Education

CADRE Steps to Success: Communicating with Your Child's School – a brochure with specific communication skills that may be helpful to parents as they develop and maintain partnerships with their child's school. Developed in partnership between CADRE and the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities, originally published, May 2004: English: http://www.directionservice.org/cadre/success.cfm Also available in: English Vietnamese From CADRE, the National Center on Dispute Resolution in Special Education: http://www.directionservice.org/cadre/success.cfm

4. Fact Sheet on Rights of English Learner Students

Fact Sheet, Ensuring English Learner Students Can Participate Meaningfully and Equally in Educational Programs (Jan. 2015) download filesPDF (443K)

From US Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/ellresources.html

5. Dear Colleague Letter re English Learner Students and LEP Parents

·  Dear Colleague Letter, English Learner Students and Limited English Proficient Parents (01/7/2015) download filesPDF (503.28K)

From US Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/ellresources.html

6. English Learner Toolkit – Introduction

Introduction (PDF, 294KB) | Translations: Vietnamese (PDF, 349KB). From US Department of Education's Office of English Language Acquisition http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/oela/english-learner-toolkit/index.html.

7. Fact Sheet, Q&A, Dear Colleague Letter re Enrollment Rights of Immigrant Students

Information from US Department of Education OCR (posted in section with Resources Available in Other Languages: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/howto-index.html). Vietnamese: ·  Thông Tin Về Các Quyền Khi Ghi Danh Học | School Enrollment Procedures - 05-08-2014 Bản Dữ Kiện PDF (248K) | Fact Sheet Các Câu Hỏi và Câu Trả Lời PDF (314K) | Questions and Answers Lá Thư Đồng Nghiệp Thân Mến PDF (214K) | Dear Colleague Letter